Pro-Trump lawyer arrested on bench warrant in Washington, D.C. – Detroit News

A chronicle of Donald Trump's Crimes or Allegations

Pro-Trump lawyer arrested on bench warrant in Washington, D.C. – Detroit News

Stefanie Lambert, a Michigan lawyer who has championed dubious claims of election fraud, was arrested in Washington, D.C., Monday afternoon because of a bench warrant, according to a spokesman for the U.S. Marshals Service.
The arrest ended an 11-day saga of uncertainty that played out after Oakland County Circuit Court Judge Jeffery Matis issued a warrant because Lambert failed to appear for a hearing related to four felony charges she’s facing in Michigan.
Lambert, who’s gained prominence among supporters of former President Donald Trump, refused to turn herself in and attempted to challenge the warrant in court filings. On Wednesday, Matis called on the attorney from South Lyon “to comply with that warrant.”
Meanwhile, Lambert has also been representing businessman Patrick Byrne, former chief executive officer of Overstock, in a defamation lawsuit brought by Dominion Voting Systems. There was a hearing in Byrne’s case in federal court in Washington, D.C., at 3 p.m. Monday. Lambert attended the hearing despite the warrant.
After the hearing concluded, all lawyers and observers, except for Lambert, exited the meeting room and U.S. marshals entered.
One reporter asked the marshals later to comment on whether an arrest was made of Lambert, and they declined to answer the question. The hearing room’s doors, at that point, were locked.
Later Monday evening, Michael Dito, a public information officer for the U.S. Marshals Service, confirmed Lambert had been arrested.
Metropolitan Police Officer Hugh Carew said late Monday that Lambert had been charged with being a fugitive from justice, a local holding charge at times used to arrest someone who has a warrant from another state.
More:2,000 pages of ‘confidential’ Dominion emails dumped on social media
In August, Special Prosecutor D.J. Hilson revealed four felony charges against her, including undue possession of a voting machine. Lambert and others who were spreading theories of fraud about the 2020 election allegedly conspired to obtain and analyze five tabulators that were used in Michigan.
Lambert has resisted getting fingerprinted by authorities as her criminal case is ongoing. In a court filing on March 8, Lambert contended that Hilson wants to use her fingerprints to compare with evidence on the tabulators.
On March 7, Matis intended to hold a court hearing on why Lambert hadn’t been fingerprinted despite orders that it happen. But Lambert didn’t attend the hearing, leading to the bench warrant.
Dan Hartman, who’s Lambert’s lawyer, argued on Wednesday that there were “communication issues,” involving Lambert and her former lawyer Michael J. Smith, causing her to not show up. Smith withdrew as Lambert’s lawyer soon after the bench warrant was issued.
Lambert represented Byrne in federal court in Washington on Monday afternoon for a hearing before Magistrate Judge Moxila Upadhyaya about why she turned over confidential records from Dominion in the case to Barry County Sheriff Dar Leaf.
In recent days, a new social media account using the name and photo of Leaf has released more than 2,100 pages of emails from employees of Dominion as the elections equipment company maintained Leaf got improper access to internal messages through the breach of a court order.
An account on the website X with the handle @SheriffLeaf sent out links to the Dominion emails, which were marked “confidential.” Leaf didn’t immediately respond Monday to a request from The Detroit News, asking whether he was personally operating the account.
Upadhyaya questioned why Lambert provided the documents to Leaf rather than ask the court to unseal them first.
Lambert said she wanted “law enforcement” to investigate the documents.
“If I had a literally dead body,” Lambert said, “I wouldn’t bring it to the court first and ask the court what to do with it.”
On Friday, attorneys for Dominion filed an emergency motion in federal court in Washington, D.C., arguing in favor of a judge disqualifying Lambert from providing legal help to Byrne in the defamation case, contending she had improperly shared with Leaf confidential records, provided under a protective order through document discovery in its lawsuit against Byrne.
The company said its employees face death threats.
“From social media calls to lynch Dominion personnel to a man armed with a rifle who came to their offices, Dominion’s employees have directly suffered the consequences of the lies spread by Byrne and his fellow defendants,” Dominion’s lawyers wrote. “They now fear further threats due to conduct of his counsel done at his direction.”
Upadhyaya didn’t rule on whether Lambert should be disqualified on Monday, calling that a “severe remedy” that would take more time to consider. She did, however, rule that Lambert and Byrne’s access to the document repository must remain cut off until further notice.
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